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CMO article by Azadeh Williams

Expert panel: Australia must innovate or bust Business, brand and tech experts warn companies to innovate with artificial intelligence, IoT or digital tech, or expect jobs will be on the line. Azadeh Williams (CMO) 17 MARCH, 2017 08:12 [[{"fid":"1964","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","attributes":{"height":"355","width":"800","class":"media-element file-default"}}]] Artificial intelligence, robotics, and the Internet of Things will place increasing pressure on job security, forcing companies to rethink the way they upskill staff and effectively manage talent, according to a panel of experts at ad:tech Sydney 2017. In 2013, two guys from Oxford University predicted that 47 per cent of US occupations will be automated as a result of AI or related technologies in the next 10-15 years, R&D firm Faethm’s CEO, Michael Priddis, claimed. “So how will we adopt these technologies and how will we experiment with AI, robotics and IoT?” he asked. “Which platforms are we going to use to build our strategies fast? Importantly, we also need to ask what it means for our jobs and our transition. Personally, I don’t think companies or people are prepared for the changes, which have already begun.” Beanstalk CEO and co-founder, Peter Bradd, said the cost to the Australian taxpayer is going to be huge if we these technologies are not harnessed in the right way. He suggested now is the time for the Federal Government to support small and big businesses to innovate using these emerging innovations and help keep employee skills relevant. “Nobody seems to be talking about it, but it has huge repercussions for Australians across the board,” he said.   CEO of business education company Xchange, Caitlin Iles, said recent figures are even more staggering, with warnings that up to 90 per cent of jobs will be gone in 10 years. “One of the things we need to do is look at education, and rethink the rise of non-traditional options for the future generation of the workforce,” she said. “Industry experience is so important, and it’s critical with brands to be as upskilled as you can be to remain relevant and competitive.” While Australians have consistently proven to be great innovators, Iles said the fault is in the commercialisation. Too often, “we’re too comfortable in thinking we have everything at hand”, she said. “But if you look at a place like Israel, the willingness to take risks in starting up a business is much higher, as you’re more concerned with your everyday well-being, that you just get on with it,” she said. “I think we need to focus more on commercialisation and collaboration. We need to work together better to support the overall ecosystem. But Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA) committee member, Tony Surtees, remained optimistic and opportunistic about the shifting landscape ahead. “We need to encourage entrepreneurs who wish to partner with us to innovate,” he said. “It used to cost a lot of money to start a Silicon-Valley style startup. Now it costs a fraction of that, which is why we are now seeing an explosion of incubators. The barrier to entry to build an Internet-based business or brand has reduced to as little as $50,000. And the change is coming.” CEO of space tech company Fleet, Flavia Tata Nardini, agreed. She stressed Australia is ripe for startup and innovative disruptors as the community is small but people are super smart and willing to take up the opportunities available. “I’m very confident to see what Australian businesses can do moving forward,” she said. “And I’m very positive to see the changes ahead.”   Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu   Read this article at http://www.cmo.com.au/article/615969/expert-panel-australia-must-innovate-bust/

which-50 article by Tess Bennett

Advertising To People, Not Cookies, Upends Campaign Metrics: Facebook & Datalicious Tess Bennett / March 16, 2017   The folks at Facebook will be talking about what it calls ‘people-based advertising’ a lot as the social media giant goes about pocketing more digital advertising dollars. People-based advertising, tracking an anonymous individual versus a cookie, has a big impact on what attribution figures look like across different channels and devices, according to research conducted by Facebook and Datalicious. Steve Lockwood, head of marketing science ANZ, Facebook outlined the measurement challenges for marketers during a presentation at the Ad:Tech conference in Sydney this week. “We know there is a disconnected across different channels in a lot of the ways that we measure advertising. There’s no common denominator currently which makes a truly comparable metric of one channel against the other in generating a return,” Lockwood said. And he is placing the blame on cookies. “The vast majority of digital advertising decisions are still based around cookies which is obviously a problem. There’s going to be wastage and there’s going to be inefficiencies,” Lockwood said. “When it came to advertising — whether it’s planning, execution or measurement — the whole internet infrastructure was built around cookies.” Cookie measurement was a perfectly fine ID when people only had one device and didn’t know they could delete cookies, Lockwood said. “Now people have multiple devices. Even if you’ve only got two, a laptop and a mobile phone, that’s different cookies. When you are using a cookie-based methodology it might look like you’ve reached two people once but you’re actually reaching one person twice.” Lockwood said Facebook’s own research showed reach is overstated by 58 per cent on average. If relying on cookies is bad then using last click attribution modelling isn’t much better. Giving 100 per cent of the credit for a conversion to the final touch point leads to misattributing campaign revenue, Lockwood said. “We’ve done our own internal analysis where we’ve seen, on average 22 per cent of incremental revenue is misattributed due to last click. Where mobile spend is high, more than 70 per cent of impressions in the campaign, as much as 54 per cent of the revenue is actually misattributed.” To test what impact people-based measurement has on campaign results, Facebook allowed Datalicious to take a look at its data. Datalicious used Facebook log in information to collect ad impressions of three ad campaigns conducted in Australia during October to December, 2016. The purpose of the study was to examine data from the campaigns at an individual level, rather than a cookie level, across multiple devices. During the Ad:Tech session Christian Bartens, CEO & co-founder of Datalicious, presented a handful of key findings from their research with Facebook. [[{"fid":"1958","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","attributes":{"style":"width: 837px; height: 450px;","class":"media-element file-default"}}]] “What we found was every person, on average, has three different cookies associated with them,” Bartens said. “Two out of those three cookies will get no credit for a conversion. That’s a big, big problem because that tends to disadvantage certain channels more than others.” Mobile tends to perform badly in a last click, cookie scenario because it is rarely the device consumers use to make a purchase. According to Bartens mobile plays a more influential role earlier in the consumer journey moving them from initial disinterest to awareness, and from awareness to intention. The problem is only going to get worse as mobile penetration rises. More smartphones, mean more cookies. “This is an issue that is becoming worse and we need to address it sooner rather than later because the proliferation of mobile devices is not going away, it’s getting worse,” Bartens said. Taken as an average from the Datalicious study, using a people-based attribution method means 1.8 times more conversions should be attributed to mobile campaigns than they currently are. Fusing desktop and mobile together under one identity also makes the customer journey 38 per cent longer. Under this scenario, Facebook and display can claim more credit for contribution to the final conversion. Facebook’s gains come at the expense of organic search and direct. “Most marketers in the room are probably undervaluing how much Facebook and Instagram advertising actually is contributing to their sales numbers,” Bartens said.   Read this article at https://which-50.com/advertising-people-not-cookies-upends-attribution-models-facebook-datalicious/

B&T Magazine article

Coke Amatil Marketing GM: “It’s NOT About The Agency Driving THEIR Agenda”A senior Coca-Cola Amatil marketeer has used her presentation at yesterday’s ad:tech conference in Sydney to remind agencies it’s not about “their agenda” and why a lack of client knowledge has become a “perennial problem” in the agency-client relationship.Sally Byrne, Coca-Cola Amatil’s GM of marketing for its alcohol and coffee lines, used her presentation – “How brands innovate using emerging technology” – to remind agencies that they’re supposed to be working for the client.[[{"fid":"1959","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","attributes":{"height":"328","width":"440","style":"width: 700px; height: 522px;","class":"media-element file-default"}}]]“It’s about genuinely walking in the client’s shoes,” Byrne suggested of the client/agency relationship. “It’s not about the agency driving its own agenda and that’s a perennial issue we have. Those partnerships, you can sort of ride them in the short term, but if you genuinely want an agency to work for you then they have to assume that they are working for the business.”In a wide-ranging presentation, Byrne didn’t shy away from Coca-Cola Amatil’s “big business issues”, “issues borne of a businesses from the 20th century” and “how to get people to drink more soft drink when they think it’s fattening?”.Byrne likened Coca-Cola Amatil marketing conundrums to the elephant and the turtle: “It’s not about two years giving birth to an elephant and hoping it will last for two years… we’ve got the turtle model where you give birth to 200 turtles and hope a couple of them get off the beach, through the water and stay alive.”However, Byrne cautioned about marketeers’ reliance on things like data when simply observing your customer was, she argued, a wholly better research proposition.Bringing up the Walkman phenomenon of the 80s, she recalls when potential customers were asked what colour they wanted and they all said yellow, but in actual consumer trials they all picked black!“We see it in our coffee [line of milk] beverages a lot,” Byrne revealed. “People always say they want a really strong coffee to wake them up but the reality is our ‘light’ selling range sells three times more than any other range.“So you just have to be really careful… you have to be watching, observing humans and there’s a number of ways to go about that.“FMCG companies have this thing around product where they either need a new one or augment the existing one in a new way… it’s ‘what does somebody need next?“And it’s usually a ‘thing’ and it’s only then things like customer experience and ROI come into it. We’re spending so much time on the product, but these days that’s not exactly what’s turning the consumer on,” she argued. Read this article at http://www.bandt.com.au/media/cokes-marketing-gm-not-agency-driving-agenda

CMO article by Jennifer O'Brien

eHarmony CMO: Marketers are getting misled by data attribution The modern marketer has to learn how to amalgamate both data and creativity, Nicole McInnes says JENNIFER O'BRIEN (CMO) 14 MARCH, 2017 13:28   The marketing industry is “misled by data attribution” and the models that are in place, said eHarmony managing director, Nicole McInnes, who addressed a crowd of marketers at ad:tech Sydney 2017. “The battlelines have been drawn. There’s data on one side, creativity on the other, and people are really sticking to their sides,” McInnes said in her presentation, ‘Marketing 2.0: How the Old Age of Marketing Could Create a New age of digital’. [[{"fid":"1961","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","attributes":{"height":"840","width":"1260","class":"media-element file-default"}}]] “There really is this awful divide in the marketing industry at the moment. The sad thing is that only one side is cool. It is the side that is new, it is intelligent, it’s novel, and, of course, it is the data side.” While c-level executives are increasingly buying into the marketing concept and recognise the validity of the discipline, particularly in the age of data intelligence, there are a few issues that data attribution brings to the industry, McInnes claimed. “First of all, there is a real overvalue of short-term tactics based on the fact that this small sliver of data is being represented as a whole picture of data,” she said. “The second thing that’s wrong is that there’s a marketing generation coming through led by data. They are not looking at a bigger picture. They are looking at one dimension of what is coming back from what we do in the marketplace. That is a dangerous place to be.” The third and most concerning problem is that data attribution doesn’t do what it promises, McInnes said. “It actually does the opposite of what’s on the bottle,” she said, citing research that shows if marketers optimise based on the data from short-term tactics, it will damage long-term growth. So what can be done? McInnes said marketers can create a four-pronged strategy on dealing with data, which will generate love for the brand. “I have a lot of data to bathe in and I like to get stuck there. I extract myself out of those dashboards and onto the data, with these four things: Purpose, people, planning and perspective.” In terms of purpose, marketing is about giving people value. “Putting purpose first has not changed with technology, in any way shape or form. The reason is because people haven’t fundamentally changed,” she continued. “They are doing things that are unimaginable with technology, things we never imagined as marketers, channels we didn’t know existed, but we haven’t evolved in 200,000 years. Our thumbs haven’t changed with texting.” Brands also need to be fast and easy. “People still believe in brands. They attach status to brands that they love and they still are attracted to brands that mean something to them,” McInnes said. “Again, it is about emotion. . . People need to love and attach themselves emotionally to a brand.” In terms of planning, while it’s not as much fun as purpose and people, McInnes said it is still pivotal to the overall data strategy. “There are no short cuts. Who doesn’t want to do a quick fix to their marketing plan? Who doesn’t want to look at their dashboard? “I love going in there and hoping the magical answer will come out, but the quick fix turnaround pales in comparison to generating data for long-term planning.” McInnes uses a myriad tools in her planning process at eHarmony, starting with a “point of departure and point of arrival”. “I think SWOT is still really valid for situational analysis and finding out where you are right now is always important to make sure your purpose and intent is really clear with consumers and staff.” At eHarmony, work is afoot to change perceptions about the company. “We have the perception of being the long-term relationship/marriage company, versus a Tinder, which is quite the opposite,” she explained. “What we wanted to do was reframe that as an enabler of happiness and love. So we came up with: We live to connect people in a way that enhances human existence.” McInnes also suggested marketers need to personify a brand, and understand the competitive map. “It is great to work out where you are now, where there is clear space, where you can go and where you should go.” While marketing in this day and age is more complex, with a myriad different channels, it comes back to the journey, she explained. “You still have to move people on a journey. Understanding the touchpoints is great, but also understanding what channels you need to feed into each of those sections of the funnel, is also key,” she said, adding she is then able to quantify the data. It is only then I start to let myself delve into all of the dashboards. “When you are bathing in data, you can get caught right down in the detail and you need to pull back to see how it is going and to see the trends over time. But as a senior person today, you need to be able to pull back in. You need to be able to understand the detail and you use your helicopter view to know where to zoom into.” Nevertheless, McInnes said marketers shouldn’t be afraid of what data can offer, as long as they understand the consumer emotion too. “The modern marketer today has to learn how to amalgamate both data and creativity. We can’t be choosing sides,” she said. “We don’t have to be data scientists, we don’t have to know how to do data regression, but don’t be afraid of what data can bring you. It is amazing. But don’t reject brand, don’t reject those long-term effects, those emotional effects. We have been so excited about attribution that we have forgotten it is a small part of the picture, and we have to look at the whole picture to actually grow our businesses.” Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu   Read this article at http://www.cmo.com.au/article/615860/eharmony-cmo-marketers-getting-misled-by-data-attribution/

CMO article by Jennifer O'Brien

Telling a story helps Football Federation Australia build brand awareness Yoshi campaign worked ‘outside the box’ to build brand awareness JENNIFER O'BRIEN (CMO) 15 MARCH, 2017 09:58   Football Federation Australia (FFA) “stopped talking only football” as it pushed out a non-traditional digital marketing campaign that aimed to make real connections with desired fans - particularly kids and young males - to support the Hyundai A-League. In 2016, the club faced a challenge, according to Rob Squillacioti, head of marketing, digital and fan engagement, who told ad:tech 2017 attendees that although football has a high participation, less than half of kids under 15 who play support a team. Around 2.18 million Australians participate in grassroots football; however, research shows that more than half of kids aged 15 years and under don’t support a Hyundai A-League team. That unsettling realisation led to the birth of the FFA campaign, ‘You Gotta Have a Team,’ hatched in concert with BMF. Squillacioti said the sole objective was to motivate the millions of Australians who play football to get on board, show their colours and pick a Hyundai A-League team, because ultimately ‘You’ve Gotta Have a Team’. “Our very simple challenge we posed to the team was, ‘how do you get kids to wear more A-League jerseys?’” Squillacioti said. “How do we fuel their fire? How do we fuel the passion for the game because they are playing it, and bring them closer to our clubs.” To do this, the club captured attention by focusing on storytelling and its unusual hero, Yoshi, a 10-year-old football-crazy kid who got up and personal with every Hyundai A-League team, then told the story through digital channels to help everyone make a choice of team to support. [[{"fid":"1963","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","attributes":{"height":"840","width":"1260","class":"media-element file-default"}}]] With today’s audiences much wiser and more tech-savvy, brands need to provide deeper connections, Squillacioti said. “We all need to capture the attention of our audiences and be a lot smarter in how we do things,” he said, explaining the organisation has a four-year vision to grow fan connection. BMF client services director, Dan Lacaze, said the campaign, which captured 238 million earned media impressions, was about harnessing the power of people’s love for their clubs. “The idea was we wanted to find one of these kids that played football, but didn’t have an A-League team, and get the 10 clubs to pitch to this kid why; why should he, or she, choose their club,” he said. “The line we came up with, ‘you Gotta Have a team,’ was brilliant because it worked at a club level, at a league level, and it was also a colloquial phrase you hear across multiple sports.” To find Yoshi, the club sent out an EDM to its Football Family database, or about one million Australians, Lacaze said, and chose him off his audition tape. “He had charisma, an interesting multicultural background. He had a great name, a very memorable name, which we knew was a powerful media hook and he was not wearing an A-League jersey, which was the exact person we were looking for,” Lacaze said. The campaign involved a six- to eight-week tour across the country, where Yoshi met players from all clubs. “That was a huge logistical challenge to manage all of that to get all of these clubs onboard because they weren’t being paid to do it. They were doing it because we inspired them with the commercial opportunities and the insight. We knew that by looking at the commercial opportunities and that insight would unlock the growth for the league.” The integrated campaign included TV, Cinema, Outdoor, Radio, Digital, SEO, ten club content films and more than one hundred pieces of video content for social. Hyundai A-League fans were encouraged to follow Yoshi’s journey online and to lobby for Yoshi’s support via social media. Lacaze said the camapign results were impressive: Twitter engagement increased by 670 per cent; fans made over 400,000 social posts; there was a six per cent increase in social following; game attendances were up 34 per cent year-on-year; TV viewership increased by 46 per cent year-on-year; and the A- League broke its all time club membership record (six per cent increase in club membership year-on-year).Additionally, the campaign’s impact helped secure the value of FFA’s biggest TV deal in the history of the league. Squillacioti said this campaign is a prime example of thinking outside of the box. “Our product is football, but none of that is football, or a very small part of it.” [[{"fid":"1962","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","attributes":{"height":"349","width":"620","style":"width: 800px; height: 450px;","class":"media-element file-default"}}]] “We really harnessed the power of our environment to sell Yoshi,” he said. “Our focus was primarily on digital and social channels and making sure we could tell a story because in 30 seconds it is hard to tell a story about ten clubs, and their unique elements. So we produced a video per club, a key content piece, where we locked the clubs to say, ‘you have three unique selling points.’ Give us the best of three and we will work with you to tell the story. And that’s how Yoshi got sold.” Lacaze said in addition to the main piece of content, the team also produced 100 pieces of content for social, roughly ten per club. “We encouraged them to get their players involved and to interact directly with the A-League page which Yoshi was running.” He said the campaign had a huge social effect in harnessing the power of the club, and in getting people to tell the message of the brands. “It was hugely rewarding to see it catch fire.” Squillacioti agreed the campaign uplifted the brand and generated quite a nationwide buzz. “We had the country behind Yoshi," who ultimately chose Melbourne City as his team which was announced on TV. Lacaze said the campaign taught the FFA use the attention economy. “Use people's passion for something you can to spread your message - and that’s what we did. We didn’t have the media budgets nor the broadcast reach of Big Bash Cricket or AFL, we had to find something that people were passionate about, people wanted to talk about and people wanted to share and spread that message for us." Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu   Read this article at http://www.cmo.com.au/article/615941/telling-story-helps-football-federation-australia-build-brand-awareness/  

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